New Zealand wines for restaurants, hotels and trade
 

Wines from Hans Family Estate


Hans Family Estate is a family-owned winery and restaurant, supported by a unique team of individuals who all share the same values: a passion for wine and food, commitment to excellence and quality.

As the name suggests, winemaker Hans Herzog's roots lie in Switzerland where the family has grown wine since 1630. There Hans and Therese owned the successful 'Taggenberg' vineyard and restaurant in the Zurich wine country.

Looking for a new challenge, in the mid 1990's they planted an 11.5 ha vineyard bordering the Wairau River in Marlborough and later moved the winery and Michelin-starred restaurant. They brought with them their philosophies of hand-crafting wine as artisans. Hans has adopted an experimentalist stance, cultivating an eclectic array of varieties (currently 26).

The vineyard benefits from a warm, dry microclimate. The vines are close-planted with a density of 5,500 vines per hectare. The yields are miniscule, quantities limited, with a total production of around 3,000 cases per annum. The wines are made at the winery on site. Hans ferments at cool temperatures using wild yeasts, the white wines barrel-fermented in 500 litre oak puncheons, the reds aged for 12-30 months in French oak barriques, creating wines rich in varietal character. The wines are released when they are deemed ready to enjoy.


Reviews & Accolades:

  • Top Wineries of New Zealand 2018 & 2019 & 2020 & 2021 – Bob Campbell MW
  • “Hans Herzog is one of Marlborough’s most precious vinous and culinary gems.” – Bob Campbell MW
  • Nominated for New World Winery of The Year at the Wine Enthusiast Wine Star Awards 2020
  • Featured in "The World's Greatest Wines“ – Michel Bettanes, Thierry Desseauve
  • “I was immensely impressed with their style and quality. The wines have attributes of the Old World in their weight, depth, complex flavours and textures, yet they manage to capture the vibrant fruitiness that Marlborough and the New World seem to possess.” – Raymond Chan